14th Nov, 2018

Waseley Hills High School headteacher 'disappointed but positive' after 'wrong time' Ofsted inspection

THE HEADTEACHER of Waseley Hills High School Alan Roll has moved to quell parents’ fears after Ofsted published its inspection report stating the school now ‘required improvement’ after being ranked ‘good’ three years ago.

The school received the report just before it broke up for the school summer holidays following the inspection on June 26 and 27.

Mr Roll sent a letter to parents, accompanying the report, with the school’s response.

Inspectors ranked the overall effectiveness, the leadership and management, quality of teaching, learning and assessment, outcome for pupils and 16 to 19 study programmes, all as ‘requiring improvement’.

GCSE results had not been good enough and pupils’ progress in 2016 and 2017 was below the national average.

They added teaching, learning and assessment, although improving, was still not good, a minority of teachers did not challenge pupils enough or have high enough expectations of able pupils and the curriculum was not good enough.

Mr Roll told The Standard he was disappointed but confident the school was already addressing everything. The inspection team said it had been a difficult inspection to carry out.

“We are in a transition period at the moment – we have made adjustments to our curriculum for the GCSE changes but they haven’t made an impact yet on the previous years’ exam results.

“This year our results were above the national average for English and at national level for maths and we expect marked improvements in the next couple of years.”

Mr Roll added Ofsted were due in February but were behind schedule and came ‘at the worst possible time’.

“It was after the pupils had taken exams so they had all left and we were still recovering from the major flood.”

A burst water main in March meant the school lost 15 classrooms, its cafe and some of the toilets.

The inspectors did praise the school for the pupils’ personal development, behaviour and welfare which was all rated ‘good’.

Leaders and managers were beginning to make effective changes to the way they monitored and evaluated pupils’ progress and previously poor outcomes for disadvantaged pupils were improving.

Ofsted said changes to senior and middle management supported teaching and learning improvements, new governors were having a positive effect and pupils with special educational needs were making better progress than they had in recent years.

Pupil behaviour was highly praised with students deemed polite, courteous and respectful and teachers were committed to the welfare of pupils who felt safe in the school.

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