11th Dec, 2018

Police appeal after illegal motorbike riders threaten Lickey Hills dog walkers

Tristan Harris 8th Oct, 2018 Updated: 8th Oct, 2018

POLICE have confirmed they are aware of an incident on Beacon Hill in Rubery last night and are investigating.

It happened at 4.45pm yesterday evening andĀ  involved around 20 motorbike riders racing around the Lickey Hills while people walked their dogs.

A video taken by a dog walker shows one of the riders threatening them to stop filming while anotherĀ can then clearly be seen deliberately spinning their back wheel at the person, covering them with dirt.

Click here to see the video

One woman told The Standard: “They are a danger to the public, especially when there are children and dogs up there.”

Insp Mark Chappell said officers responded to a report of anti-social behaviour just after 5pm yesterday.

“They flagged the incident to our colleagues at West Midlands Police, as our officers located the bikers when they were moving into the West Midlands Police force area.

“We understand that these kind of incidents can be unsettling for the local community, but I want to reassure residents that we will be continuing to patrol the area, and would urge anyone who sees people acting in this way to get in touch with us.

“We absolutely will not tolerate this behaviour.”

He urged anyone with any information on the incident or who the riders are to contact them on 101 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

PACT meeting tonight

THE Next Rubery PACT (Partners and Communities Together) meeting takes place at 7pm tonight in The Enterprise Centre of Waseley Hills High School.

Residents who have concerns about their local area are being urged to go along and air those issues.

There will also be details of the improvements to the land on the corner of Callowbrook Bridge Road and New Road which are currently on display in Rubery Library.

The work on the project has already started.

 

Police issue anti-social behaviour and off-road motorbikes advice

Officers want to make it clear that it is illegal to ride any motorbike in public open spaces such as parks, play areas and on pavements.

They can only be legally ridden off-road if it is on private land and the rider has the land owner’s permission. Land owned by the council is not classed as private land.

To reduce harm to individuals and communities police operations may be carried out in areas with illegally used off-road motorcycles being seized and crushed.

What does the law say?

In law, off road motorbikes are regarded as motor vehicles which must be constructed to a specific standard to be ridden on a public highway.

Most off road motorbikes do not meet this standard.

If they are used on the public highway, they need a DVLA registration (log book), road tax, a valid MoT, lights, registration plates and approved tyres.

Riders must be 17 or 16 if the vehicle meets the definition of a moped, hold a valid driving licence, have valid insurance and wear suitable safety clothing, including a motorbike helmet.

If any of the conditions are not met, the riding of the motorbike on the road is illegal and failure to comply is a criminal offence and may result in prosecution under the Road Traffic Act 1988 and Police Reform Act 2002.

 

How can local communities help?

People are being urged to report motorbikes being ridden illegally to the police. They need to give the name and address of the owner of the off-road motorbike, where it is stored, when and where it is being used (days, times and routes) and any other useful information, including descriptions of those using the bike and its make, model and colour.

Under the ASB, Crime and Policing Act 2014, the police and council can take out civil injunctions, serve Criminal Behaviour Orders (CRIMBOs), community protection notices and public space protection orders (PSPOs).

Dispersal orders can also be used by officers.

The police have also issued advice and a reminder of the law when it comes to using off-road motorbikes.

Officers want to make it clear that it is illegal to ride any motorbike in public open spaces such as parks, play areas and on pavements.

They can only be legally ridden off-road if it is on private land and the rider has the land owner’s permission. Land owned by the council is not classed as private land.

To reduce harm to individuals and communities police operations may be carried out in areas with illegally used off-road motorcycles being seized and crushed.

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