30th Nov, 2020

Bromsgrove campaigner's concerns over safety of 5G networks

A CAMPAIGNER has expressed concerns about the health implications of the UK’s 5G network and called for a full debate on its safety.

Phil Haynes, from Bromsgrove, said he felt there should have been proper tests before decisions to create networks were taken.

“Back in the day when a mobile phone mast was put up there were protests about the damage the waves could do and there were restrictions about them being sited by schools – and that was only 3G.

“Next there was 4G and that has not been around long enough to see if there have been any negative effects on people or their health.

“Now these 5G masts are a lot stronger and in order to achieve the coverage these companies need there will have to be transmitters every few hundred feet.

“The first 5G network was only rolled out in South Korea in April last year so that has not even been operating for 12 months.

“How can we know what impact those waves are having on people?”

He said 5G was first invented for the military and the network’s waves were similar to ones used in crowd control.

He added he felt the mobile phone coverage locally and nationally was sufficient for most people.

“Do we really need to download films in five seconds flat?”

He said the 5G network would be used in years to come with driverless cars and other future developments but he questioned whether anymore automation and ‘intrusive’ technology was needed in our everyday lives.

Other people have also expressed concerns on our Facebook page about the need for 5G and the millions of taxpayers’ money being spent on the networks.

John Adkins said: “4G works fine,” while Green Party campaigner Neil Franks added: “Total waste of money by the Government.”

After being notified of £3.3million worth of Government funding, Worcestershire County Council announced last week a West Mercia Rural Project would begin in April to look at the ‘positive effects’ of 5G.

In response to Mr Haynes’ claims, Simon Mann, Public Health England’s (PHE) head of radiation dosimetry, said: “It is possible there may be a small increase in overall exposure to radio waves when 5G is added to an existing telecommunications network or in a new area – however, the overall exposure is expected to remain low relative to guidelines and as such there should be no consequences for public health.”

PHE said exposure to 5G radio waves should comply with the International Committee on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines, adding it was committed to keeping its advice under review and updating it should new evidence dictate it necessary.

There had been a general trend towards increasing numbers of smaller transmitters, since telecommunications networks were introduced.

Measurements taken currently show the general public’s exposure to radio waves was well within ICNIRP guidelines and these same standards would be applied to 5G networks with operators already committed to the guidelines.

Mr Haynes urged anyone wanting to be part of a 5G debate to email him at phil@philhaynes.co.uk to express their interest.

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